Exhibitions      Info        Instagram    Texts & Reviews






Opening hours:
Thursday 12—4pm

Friday 12—4pm
Saturday 12—4pm
Sunday 12—4pm



Ida Wieth
wander / wonder

-
Unfolding Questions, Codes,
and Contours

at Tromsø Kunstforening
10.10 - 20.12




Past Exhibitions
— 2020



Lilian Nabulime, Bathsheba Okwenje,
Miriam Watsemba, Maria Brinch.
My Mother Is Forgetting My Face.
Curated by Martha Kazungu



Ian Giles
After BUTT
at Kunstnerforbundet


Oliver Ressler
Carbon and Captivity


Sara Wolfert
Head Channel & Lion 
- Waking of the Sleeping Lion Ear


Kjersti Vetterstad
A Beehive in My Heart

Halldis Rønning
Watermusic



Past Exhibitions
— 2019



Kristin Austreid
Et underlig redskap

Bergen Assembly
Actually, the Dead Are Not Dead

Anne de Boer, Eloïse Bonneviot
the Mycological Twist

Kamilla Langeland
Stories of the Mind
(Transitioning Into Uncertainty)


Maria Brinch
INYA LAKE

— at Kunstnernes Hus


Bathsheba Okwenje
Freedom of Movement
at  Kunstnernes Hus

Lina Viste Grønli
Nye skulpturer


Toril Johannessen
SKOGSAKEN (The Forest Case)

Marysia Lewandowska
It’s About Time

(in Venice Biennial)

Films by
Mai Hofstad Gunnes


Isme Film
Collectively Conscious Remembrance


Trond Lossius
Jeremy Welsh
The Atmospherics
River deep, mountain high



Exhibitions 
— 2018



Marjolijn Dijkman
Toril Johannessen
Reclaiming Vision

Damir Avdagic
Reenactment/Process
Reprise/Response


Eivind Egeland
Father of Evil

Marysia Lewandowska
Rehearsing the Museum


Anton Vidokle
Immortality for All: a film trilogy on
Russian Cosmism

Curated by
Ingrid Haug Erstad

Johanna Billing
Pulheim Jam Session,
I’m Gonna Live Anyhow Until I die,
I’m Lost Without Your Rhythm,
This is How We Walk on the Moon,
Magical World


Jenine Marsh
Kneading Wheel, 
Coins and Tokens

Jenine Marsh
Sofia Eliasson
Lasse Årikstad
Johanna Lettmayer
Lewis & Taggar
Jon Benjamin Tallerås
Orientering 
—  a group show in public space


Jon Rafman
Dream Journal
2016-2017


Goutam Ghosh &
Jason Havneraas
PAARA

Ian Giles
After BUTT

Films by Yafei Qi
Wearing The Fog, 
I Wonder Why, 
Life Tells Lies

Exhibitions
— 2017

Daniel Gustav Cramer
Five Days

Kamilla Langeland
Sjur Eide Aas
The Thinker, Flower Pot and Mush

Danilo Correale
Equivalent Unit
Reverie: On the Liberation from Work


Valentin Manz
Useful Junk

Jeannine Han
Dan Riley
Time Flies When Slipping
Counter-Clockwise


Pedro Gómez-Egaña
Pleasure

Ane Graff
Mattering Waves


Andrew Amorim
Lest We Perish

Tom S. Kosmo
Unnatural Selection

Jenine Marsh
Lindsay Lawson

Dear Stranger


Exhibitions
— 2016


ALBUM
Eline Mugaas
Elise Storsveen
How to Feel Like a Woman

DKUK (Daniel Kelly)
Presents: Jóhanna Ellen
Digital Retreat Dot Com

Cato Løland
Folded Lines, Battles and Events

Harald Beharie
Louis Schou-Hansen
(S)kjønn safari 2.0

Lynda Benglis
On Screen
Bergen Assembly

Linn Pedersen
Bjørn Mortensen
Terence Koh
NADA New York

Ida Nissen
Kamilla Langeland
Marthe Elise Stramrud
Christian Tunge
Eivind Egeland
Fading Forms

Anders Holen
Stimulus

Sinta Werner
Vanishing Lines

Exhibitions
— 2015


Bjørn Mortensen
Pouches and Pockets
/ Compositories in Color


Linn Pedersen
Plain Air

Øystein Klakegg
Entrée # 55

Leander Djønne
Petroglyphs of the Indebted Man

Lewis & Taggart
Black Holes and other painted objects


Azar Alsharif
Bjørn Mortensen
Steinar Haga Kristensen
Lewis & Taggart
Vilde Salhus Røed
Heidi Bjørgan
NADA New York

Linda Sormin
Heidi Bjørgan
Collision

Steinar Haga Kristensen
The Fundamental Part of Any Act

Exhibitions
—2014


Tora Endestad Bjørkheim
Bjørn-Henrik Lybeck


Mathijs van Geest
The passenger eclipsed
the object that I could have
seen otherwise


Marit Følstad
Sense of Doubt

Oliver Laric
Yuanmingyuan3D

Terence Koh
sticks, stones and bones 

Kristin Tårnesvik
Espen Sommer Eide
Korsmos ugressarkiv

Exhibitions
— 2013


André Tehrani
Lost Allusions


Pedro Gómez-Egaña
Object to be Destroyed


Flag New York City

Christian von Borries
I’m M
Institute of Political Hallucinations
Bergen Assembly

Dillan Marsh
June Twenty-First

Vilde Salhus Røed
For the Sake of Colour


Azar Alsharif
The distant things seem close (…)
the close remote (…) the air is loaded


Magnhild Øen Nordahl
Omar Johnsen
Trialog

Lars Korff Lofthus
New Work

Exhibitions
— 2012


Anngjerd Rustan
The Dust Will Roll Together

Cato Løland
Oliver Pietsch
Love is Old, Love is New

Stian Ådlandsvik
Abstract Simplicity of Need

Sinta Werner
Something that stands for
Something / Double
Described Tautologies


Kjersti Vetterstad
Lethargia

Anna Lundh
Grey Zone

Arne Rygg
Borghild Rudjord Unneland
Lisa Him-Jensen
Cato Løland
Lewis & Taggart
Klara Sofie Ludvigsen
Magnhild Øen Nordahl
Mathijs van Geest
Andrea Spreafico
Flag Bergen

Exhibitions
— 2011


Karen Skog & Mia Øquist
Skog & Øquist systematiserer

Danilo Correale
We Are Making History

Sveinung Rudjord Unneland
U.T.

Ethan Hayes-Chute
Make/Shifted Cabin

Ebba Bohlin
Per-Oskar Leu
Kaia Hugin
Pica Pica

Gabriel Kvendseth
First We Take Mannahatta

Roger von Reybekiel
Do Everything Fantastic

Exhibitions
— 2010



Michael Johansson
27m3

Tone Wolff Kalstad
This Color Is Everywhere


Knud Young Lunde
Road Show Event Plan


Alison Carey
Ivan Twohig
Benjamin Gaulon
On The In-Between


Mercedes Mühleisen
Øyvind Aspen
Birk Bjørlo
Damir Avdagic
Annette Stav Johanssen
If Everything Else Fails...

Mart
Ciara Scanlan
Matthew Nevin
An Instructional

Patrick Wagner
Nina Nowak
Samuel Seger Patricia Wagner
South of No North

Gandt
Agnes Nedregaard Midskills
Patrick Coyle
Boogey Boys Santiago Mostyn
Bergen Biennale 2010 by Ytter

Lars Korff Lofthus
West Norwegian Pavilion


Serina Erfjord
Repeat


Mattias Arvastsson
Presence No.5


Malin Lennström-Örtwall
It`s like Nothing Ever Happened

Exhibitions
— 2009


Tor Navjord
FM/AM

Ragnhild Johansen
Erased Knot Painting


Entrée Radio


Lewis and Taggart
Ledsagende lydspor


In Conversation:
Gómez-Egaña and
Mathijs van Geest


In Conversation:
Andrew Amorim and
Mitch Speed


In Conversation:
Ane Graff and Alex Klein


In Conversation:
Martin Clark and Daniel Kelly


Ludo Sounds with
Tori Wrånes




In Conversation:
Stine Janvin Motland,
Kusum Normoyle,
Mette Rasmussen,
Cara Stewart



Randi Grov Berger
Contact/Info/CV
Other projects







Mark
October 10th— December 20th, 2020

Unfolding Questions, Codes, and Contours

at Tromsø Kunstforening

Opening at Tromsø Kunstforening Saturday October 10th, from 12-17, welcome.




Flags by Jørund Aase Falkenberg, Azar Alsharif, Marsil Andelov Al-Mahamid, A Practice for Everyday Life, Damir Avdagic, Rosa Barba, Javier Barrios, Wendimagegn Belete, Hildur Bjarnadóttir, Are Blytt, Christian von Borries, Maria Brinch, Marco Bruzzone, Tanya Busse, Danilo Correale, Espen Dietrichson, Leander Djønne and Lars Korff Lofthus, Sjur Eide Aas, Ida Ekblad, Sammy Engramer, Serina Erfjord, Juan-Pedro Fabra Guemberena, Kjersti Foyn, Mathijs van Geest, Ulrika Gomm, Steinar Haga Kristensen, Jeannine Han and Dan Riley, Tamara Henderson, Petri Henriksson, Lisa Him-Jensen, Laura Horelli, David Horvitz, Marianne Hurum, Toril Johannessen, Sanya Kantarovsky and Liz Magic Laser, Annette Kierulf and Caroline Kierulf, Ingeborg Kvame, Erik Larsson, Else Leirvik, Malin Lennström-Örtwall, Gabriel Lester, Lewis & Taggart, Klara Sofie Ludvigsen, Anna Lundh, Cato Løland, Cameron MacLeod, Jumana Manna, Valentin Manz, Dillan Marsh, Kyle Morland, Santiago Mostyn, Joar Nango, Jordan Nassar, Randi Nygård, Bathsheba Okwenje, Raqs Media Collective, Oliver Ressler, Borghild Rudjord Unneland, Athi-Patra Ruga, Arne Rygg, Andrea Spreafico, André Tehrani, Kristin Tårnes, Sandra Vaka, Kjersti Vetterstad, Lina Viste Grønli, Lin Wang, Bedwyr Williams, Magnhild Øen Nordahl, and Stian Ådlandsvik
Curated by Randi Grov Berger.

Unfolding Questions, Codes, and Contours is an exhibition filling the second floor of Tromsø Kunstforening to its brim with flags designed by artists. These works have previously occupied both private and public flagpoles, creating new and unpredictable encounters in sites ranging from the rural village of Nesflaten in Norway’s Rogaland County to the urban metropolis of Manhattan.

Activating empty flagpoles and exploring the flag as an artistic medium are the driving forces behind the project, which was initiated by the artist-run gallery Entrée, Bergen in 2012. Since the project’s inception, new flags have been regularly commissioned for the collection, and this retrospective brings together a total of seventy unique works by international artists and artist groups. Over the last five years, a different flag work has been showcased each month on the towering flagpole located in the park facing Tromsø Kunstforening’s historical building. Now, for the first time, the flags are united in a single exhibition, giving them a moment to rest while providing an opportunity to examine their details, colours, symbols, and complex meanings.

Hailing from twenty-six native countries, the featured artists express a rich diversity of perspectives, offering flags ranging from political protests to language games, from reversals of power structures to studies in colour and abstraction, and from historical mashups to poetic celebrations of gestures and rituals. Within the collection are works created to honour specific groups, suggest new territories, demand social change, and deconstruct propaganda.

Some of the flags play with our perception by revealing new information as we approach them, demonstrating the power of signs and at times illuminating state authority. Others address citizenship, asking key questions about identity, nationality, and inclusion while critiquing border controls in favour of more generous systems of co-existence. In certain works, pre-existing flags are scrutinized and dismantled through alteration and collage, and many of the artists’ flags confront the current climate crisis, such as Oliver Ressler’s controversialOil Spill Flag, which stirred up a heated debate in Tromsø throughout the summer of 2020.

Essential themes in artistic practices are often amplified when transposed into flag format and displayed in public space. This is certainly true of Oil Spill Flag, which depicts the Norwegian national flag soaked with oil. When Oil Spill Flag was first presented outside Tromsø Kunstforening, right-wing politicians, including the local county’s governor, argued for it to be removed on the grounds that it is illegal to smear the country's national symbol, and the flag was therefore in violation of Norwegian law. Others publicly defended Ressler’s work and pointed to Norway’s indisputable contribution to the climate catastrophe.[1]

The use of colours and symbols on flags has a long and complex history, studied in the field of Vexillology. The practice of designing flags is called vexillography, within which there are stringent regulations regarding colour, positioning, proportion, balance, typography, and overall aesthetic. Many flags in the exhibition break away from these customs while others engage with their ruling principles in new and intellectual ways. In confronting the conventions of flags, certain works cast aside the standard rectangular format and symmetrical mode of representation, while others actively abandon all national references, exploring what an ambivalent flag with no distinctive shapes or colours could represent.

Flags are strong symbols of power and typically communicate affiliations with nations, religions, associations, or identities. They are used both in warfare and celebration, and have many ceremonial rituals attached to them. Their symbolic value when burned or raised, whether fully or at half-mast, is universal. Lives have been risked in efforts to plant flags in the most inhospitable and weather-beaten of places, such as the North Pole and the world’s highest mountain tops, as well as underneath melting Arctic ice to claim ownership of future oil reservoirs. The culture of flag-planting (a recognized plague of so-called explorers driving flags into every last patch of land), has even been brought to outer space; the American flag was famously placed on the Moon in 1969, and the USA’s next goal is Mars.[2] Discussions are ongoing as to which flag should be planted there – should it rather represent the human race as a whole?

Throughout the summer of 2020, several historical monuments and statues representing colonial powers were torn down and destroyed publicly as an extension of the widespread demonstrations held in protest of systemic racism and police violence after the killing of George Floyd. Sparking similar opposition was the state flag of Mississippi, bearing the official emblem of the pro-slavery, Confederate States during the American Civil War. A longstanding source of trauma and division, the design was finally abandoned under increasing nationwide pressure, and at the time of writing, the state of Mississippi has no official state flag.

Other flags engage the public in more positive ways. In 1978, the American activist and artist Gilbert Baker designed the rainbow flag as an affirmation of unity and allegiance within the LGBT community. In doing so, Baker “discovered the depth of [flags’] power, their transcendent, transformational quality.” He continues: “I thought of the emotional connection they hold. I thought how most flags represented a place. They were primarily nationalistic, territorial, iconic propaganda – all things we questioned in the ‘70s. Gay people were tribal, individualistic, a global collective that was expressing itself in art and politics. We needed a flag to fly everywhere.” Now, in 2020, the rainbow flag is an established symbol of pride, dignity, and human rights, and several adaptations exist to represent a broader diversity of self-identifying groups.

A flag is inevitably a statement – publicly hoisting it up a pole makes it so. Yet, its lightness and customary outdoor placement render it unstable, left to the volatile forces of nature. A flag flaps helplessly upon its pole – or hangs around it, soaking wet – at the mercy of weather and misinterpretation in equal measure. Simple, familiar, yet full of contrasts, the flag is a format open to endless contradictions and permutations, as is eloquently demonstrated by the artists featured in Unfolding Questions, Codes, and Contours. Here, the flag reveals its limitless capacity to probe its own history, rewrite its own traditions, and extend its own legacy.

Iterations of the project have been presented at Entrée, Bergen (2012); L/R, Nesflaten (2013); Performa Biennial, New York (2013); Kunsthall Stavanger (2014); and Tromsø Kunstforening (2015 - 2020). All flags commissioned by Entrée, in collaboration with L/R, Performa, and Tromsø Kunstforening.


[1] Oil Spill Flag was stolen from Tromsø Kunstforening’s flagpole and, after the theft was reported to the police, a former supreme court attorney admitted to having taken it. The flag was returned, re-mounted, and stolen again, whereupon unidentified activists attempted to redirect attention to the subject matter of Ressler’s work by installing a flag borrowed from the local Circle K gas station in its place.
[2] In June of 2020, United States President Donald Trump announced: “The United States will be the first nation to plant our beautiful American flag on planet Mars."



/Norsk/


Unfolding Questions, Codes, and Contours er en utstilling som fyller andre etasje i Tromsø Kunstforening til randen med flagg designet av kunstnere. Disse verkene har tidligere lagt krav på både private og offentlige flaggstenger, og skapt nye og uforutsigbare møter på steder som spenner fra den vesle bygda Nesflaten i Rogaland til den urbane metropolen Manhattan i New York.

Å aktivere tomme flaggstenger og utforske flagget som et kunstnerisk medium er motivasjonen bak prosjektet som ble initiert av det kunstnerdrevne galleriet Entrée i Bergen i 2012. Regelmessig har kunstnere laget nye flagg til samlingen, og i denne retrospektive utstillingen samles totalt sytti flaggverk av internasjonale kunstnere og kunstnergrupper.

I løpet av de siste fem årene har det blitt vist et nytt flagg hver måned på den ruvende flaggstangen i Muséparken utenfor Tromsø Kunstforenings klassisistiske bygning. I denne utstillingen forenes flaggene for første gang, noe som gir dem et øyeblikks hvile mens vi som betraktere får muligheten til å nærmere undersøke detaljer, farger, symboler og deres komplekse betydninger.

Med opphav fra tjueseks land, uttrykker kunstnerne et rikt mangfold av perspektiver, gjennom arbeider som spenner fra politiske protester til språkspill, fra kritikk av maktstrukturer til studier i farger og abstraksjoner, og fra historiske synteser til poetiske feiringer av gester og ritualer. Inkludert i samlingen er verk laget for å hedre bestemte grupper, foreslå nye territorier, kreve sosial endring og dekonstruere propaganda.

Noen av flaggene leker med vår persepsjon ved å avsløre ny informasjon når vi nærmer oss, de demonstrerer kraften til ulike symboler og tegn og til tider belyses statsmyndighet. Andre tar for seg statsborgerskap og stiller viktige spørsmål om identitet, nasjonalitet og inkludering mens de kritiserer grensekontroll til fordel for mer generøse systemer for sameksistens. I enkelte verk blir eksisterende flagg inspisert og oppløst gjennom ulike endringer eller sammenkoblinger, og mange av flaggene konfronterer den nåværende klimakrisen, slik som Oliver Resslers kontroversielle Oil Spill Flag, som skapte debatt i Tromsø gjennom sommeren 2020.

Viktige temaer i en kunstnerisk praksis forsterkes gjerne når de uttrykkes i flaggformat og vises i det offentlige rom. Dette gjelder absolutt Oil Spill Flag, som viser det norske nasjonalflagget dynket i olje. Da Oil Spill Flag først ble vist, argumenterte høyreorienterte politikere, inkludert fylkesmannen, for at det skulle fjernes med den begrunnelsen at det er ulovlig å tilsmøre nasjonalflagget, og at verket dermed var i strid med Norsk flagglov. Andre forsvarte Resslers arbeid offentlig og pekte på Norges ubestridelige bidrag til klimakatastrofen.[1]

Bruken av farger og symboler på flagg har en lang og kompleks historie, studert innen vexillologi. Praksisen med å designe flagg kalles vexillografi, der det er strenge regler for bruk av farge, posisjonering, proporsjon, balanse, typografi og generell estetikk. Mange flagg i utstillingen bryter med disse skikkene mens andre engasjerer seg i gjeldende prinsipper på nye og intellektuelle måter. Ved å konfrontere flaggkonvensjonene kaster visse verk til side det standardiserte rektangulære formatet og den symmetriske representasjonsmåten, mens andre aktivt forkaster alle nasjonale referanser og utforsker hva et ambivalent flagg uten særegne former eller farger kan representere.

Flagg er sterke maktsymboler og kommuniserer vanligvis tilknytning til nasjoner, religioner, foreninger eller identiteter. De brukes både i krigføring og feiring, og har mange seremonielle ritualer knyttet til seg. Deres symbolske verdi når de brennes eller når de heves, enten til topps eller på halv stang, er universell. Flere liv har blitt risikert i kampen om å plante flagg på de mest ugjestmilde og værbitte steder, for eksempel Nordpolen og verdens høyeste fjelltopper, samt under smeltende arktisk is for å gjøre krav på fremtidige oljereservoarer. Flaggplantingskulturen (hvor såkalte oppdagelsesreisende har drevet flagg inn i hvert eneste landområde), er til og med brakt til verdensrommet; det amerikanske flagget ble berømmelig plantet på månen i 1969, og landets neste mål er nå Mars.[2] Det pågår diskusjoner om hvilket flagg som skal plantes der – kunne det være noe som bedre representerer hele menneskeheten?

I løpet av sommeren 2020 ble flere historiske monumenter og statuer som representerer kolonimaktene revet ned og ødelagt som en forlengelse av de omfattende demonstrasjonene som ble holdt i protest mot systemisk rasisme og politivold etter drapet på George Floyd. Noe som utløste lignende opposisjon var Mississippis statsflagg, som inneholdt det offisielle kampemblemet til de konfødererte statene som var for slaveriet under den amerikanske borgerkrigen. Det omstridte sørstatskorset er en langvarig kilde til traumer og splittelse, og designet ble i sommer til slutt forkastet etter økende press fra hele landet. I skrivende stund har delstaten Mississippi ikke noe offisielt statsflagg.

Andre flagg engasjerer offentligheten på mer positive måter. I 1978 designet den amerikanske aktivisten og kunstneren Gilbert Baker regnbueflagget som en bekreftelse på felleskap og samhold i LHBT-miljøer. Ved å gjøre dette, "oppdaget Baker dybden av deres [flaggs] makt, deres overskridende, transformerende kvalitet." Han fortsetter: "Jeg tenkte på den følelsesmessige forbindelsen de har. På hvordan de fleste flagg representerte et sted. De var først og fremst nasjonalistisk, territoriell, ikonisk propaganda - alle ting vi stilte spørsmålstegn ved på 70-tallet. Homofile mennesker var som en stamme, på den ene siden individualistiske, men også som et globalt kollektiv som uttrykte seg i kunst og politikk. Vi trengte et flagg som kunne vaie overalt." Nå, i 2020, er regnbueflagget et etablert symbol på stolthet, verdighet og menneskerettigheter, og flere variasjoner har blitt laget for å inkludere et større mangfold av selvidentifiserende grupper.

Et flagg er uunngåelig en erklæring – i det man heiser det opp i en stang i det offentlige rom. Likevel gjør dets letthet og typiske utendørs plassering det ustabilt, overlatt til naturkreftene. Et flagg klaffer hjelpeløst på stangen sin - eller henger klebet rundt den, gjennomvåt - utsatt for både vær og mistolkning. Enkelt, gjenkjennbart, men likevel fullt av kontraster, er flagget et format åpent for endeløse motsetninger og bearbeidinger, som det så kraftfullt demonstreres av kunstnerne som vises i Unfolding Questions, Codes and Contours. Her avslører flagget sin ubegrensede kapasitet til å undersøke sin egen historie, omskrive sine egne tradisjoner og utvide sin egen arv.

Utgaver av prosjektet er presentert ved Entrée, Bergen (2012); L/R, Nesflaten (2013); Performa Biennial, New York (2013); Kunsthall Stavanger (2014); og Tromsø Kunstforening (2015 - 2020). Alle flagg er produsert av Entrée, i samarbeid med L/R, Performa og Tromsø Kunstforening.

[1] Oil Spill Flag ble stjålet fra Tromsø Kunstforenings flaggstang, og etter at tyveriet ble politianmeldt, innrømmet en tidligere høyesterettsadvokat å ha tatt det. Flagget ble returnert, montert og stjålet igjen, hvorpå uidentifiserte aktivister forsøkte å omdirigere oppmerksomheten til temaet for Resslers arbeid ved å installere et flagg lånt fra den lokale Circle K bensinstasjonen.
[2] I juni 2020 kunngjorde USAs president Donald Trump: "USA vil være den første nasjonen som planter vårt vakre amerikanske flagg på planeten Mars."


Flagg av Jørund Aase Falkenberg, Azar Alsharif, Marsil Andelov Al-Mahamid, A Practice for Everyday Life, Damir Avdagic, Rosa Barba, Javier Barrios, Wendimagegn Belete, Hildur Bjarnadóttir, Are Blytt, Christian von Borries, Maria Brinch, Marco Bruzzone, Tanya Busse, Danilo Correale, Espen Dietrichson, Leander Djønne og Lars Korff Lofthus, Sjur Eide Aas, Ida Ekblad, Sammy Engramer, Serina Erfjord, Juan-Pedro Fabra Guemberena, Kjersti Foyn, Mathijs van Geest, Ulrika Gomm, Steinar Haga Kristensen, Jeannine Han og Dan Riley, Tamara Henderson, Petri Henriksson, Lisa Him-Jensen, Laura Horelli, David Horvitz, Marianne Hurum, Toril Johannessen, Sanya Kantarovsky og Liz Magic Laser, Annette Kierulf og Caroline Kierulf, Ingeborg Kvame, Erik Larsson, Else Leirvik, Malin Lennström-Örtwall, Gabriel Lester, Lewis & Taggart, Klara Sofie Ludvigsen, Anna Lundh, Cato Løland, Cameron MacLeod, Jumana Manna, Valentin Manz, Dillan Marsh, Kyle Morland, Santiago Mostyn, Joar Nango, Jordan Nassar, Randi Nygård, Bathsheba Okwenje, Raqs Media Collective, Oliver Ressler, Borghild Rudjord Unneland, Athi-Patra Ruga, Arne Rygg, Andrea Spreafico, André Tehrani, Kristin Tårnes, Sandra Vaka, Kjersti Vetterstad, Lina Viste Grønli, Lin Wang, Bedwyr Williams, Magnhild Øen Nordahl, og Stian Ådlandsvik.
Kuratert av Randi Grov Berger.
Entrée, Bergen



Mark